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The National Association of Baptist Professors of Religion is a community of teaching scholars. Most members teach at Baptist-affiliated schools, colleges, and seminaries, but members also hail from a wide range of institutions in the United States, Canada, and abroad, including church-related and state-supported schools.
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CFP: ”Incarnation and Identity”

Call for Papers
”Incarnation and Identity”
A Scholarly Conference
held in conjunction with the
ABC/USA Biennial Mission Summit
Virginia Beach, Virginia
June 20th, 2019

The Office of the General Secretary of ABC-USA and the Theologians’ Commission will host the
fifth pre-biennial theology conference around the theme Incarnation and Identity in an
effort to foster ongoing, vigorous theological conversations among American Baptist
theologians, pastor-theologians, and theological educators throughout the denomination.

The Theologians’ Commission invites proposals of p1·esentations that address notions of
Incarnation and Identity from Baptist perspectives. Scholars of social ethics, systematic
theology, biblical studies, church history, missiology, and practical theology are invited to offer
proposals for a 20-minute presentation. Additionally, panels of three participants may be
proposed. Presentations that explore the views and perspectives of under-represented groups
are encouraged.

Proposals must contain: the author’s full name, institutional affiliation, email and telephone
contact, as well as an abstract of the paper. The abstract should include the title and the thesis
of the presentation, a brief summary of the argument to be made, explicit connection to the
conference theme and a beginning bibliography. Proposals sho11ld be between 750 and
1000 words, and are due by February 1st, 2019.

Full papers may then be submitted for publication consideration to the American Baptist Quarterly.
Authors should attend to that audience as readers rather than listeners.
Papers submitted for publication should be 6000-10,000 words long and must be fully
footnoted. The deadline for submission to ABQ editors is August 1, 2019. Guidelines for authors
will be distributed to conference presenters.

Submit paper proposals before February 1, 2019 to Dr. Donald Brash –
Notification of acceptance will be given in March, 2019.

The Theologians Conference will take place in conjunction with the 2019 Biennial Mission
Summit of American Baptist Churches, USA Conferees will gather at the Virginia Beach
Convention Center on Thursday, June 20th, 2019, 8:00am – 5:30pm.

The conveners regret that we are not able to pay honoraria or expenses. Presenters must
register for the Conference.

American Baptist Quarterly, Call for Papers

American Baptist Quarterly (ABQ) is the peer-reviewed journal of the American Baptist Historical Society. Both established and emerging scholars are invited to submit papers written from original research. Articles and essays should be between 6,000 and 10,000 words. If you are interested in submitting a paper for one of the upcoming issues, please contact editor Curtis Freeman (u) as soon as possible.

 

ABQ Call For Papers
Upcoming Themes Submit By:
Reception of Evangelical Mission in India Dec. 1, 2018
Celebrating Women in Ministry:
biblical, theological, and historical reflections, upon the occasion of
the 40th anniversary of
American Baptist Women in Ministry
Mar. 1, 2019
On Foreigners and Neighbors:
biblical, theological, ethical, and historical perspectives on immigration and hospitality
June 1, 2019
Baptists in Rhode Island June 1, 2019

New Book: Freedom Faith: The Womanist Vision of Prathia Hall

Freedom Faith: The Womanist Vision of Prathia Hall by Courtney Pace
Book Cover

Courtney Pace, Freedom Faith: The Womanist Vision of Prathia Hall Hardcover – June 15, 2019
(Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2019). ISBN: 9780820355061.

Announcing, Freedom Faith: The Womanist Vision of Prathia Hall, a forthcoming book by NABPR member and 2013 dissertation scholarship awardee, Dr. Courtney Pace, of Memphis Theological Seminary. The book is now available for pre-order.

I stood in the authenticity of my being: Black, preacher, Baptist, woman. For the same God who made me a preacher made me a woman, and I am convinced that God was not confused on either account.
~ Rev. Dr. Prathia Hall

Rev. Dr. Prathia Hall was a Baptist pastor, professor, activist, Womanist theologian, & more. She held the Martin Luther, King Jr. Chair in Social Ethics at Boston University School of Theology and she later became the dean of United Theological Seminary in Dayton, Ohio and director of the Harriet Miller Women’s Center. According to Pace, “In 1997, Ebony magazine named Hall first in its list of 15 Greatest Black Women Preachers, and she was the only woman considered for its list of 10 Greatest Black Preachers, ultimately placing 11th.”

Rev. Dr. Prathia Hall’s theology revolved around freedom faith, the belief that God wants all people to be free and equips those who work for freedom. This dissertation offers a thematic biography of Hall, paying particular attention to her activism in the Civil Rights Movement and her womanist preaching ministry, through the lens of freedom faith. Hall first learned of freedom faith from her father, growing up in North Philadelphia. Through her training in Fellowship House and her activism with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee in Southwest Georgia and Selma, Alabama, Hall’s freedom faith matured. After the Movement, Hall returned North and pursued theological education at Princeton Theological Seminary, where her freedom faith culminated in womanist liberation theology.

New Report on the State of Clergywomen in the U.S. is now available 

Recent past NABPR president, Rev. Dr. Eileen Campbell-Reed has been working to answer the question “How are women faring in ministry in U.S. churches?.” In this report she provides not only a statistical accounting but also an analysis of some of the trends.

One measure of how women are doing is to consider the statistical status of their entry into ministry and leadership in congregations and other ministry settings. A statistical analysis is one dimension of clergywomen’s faring that we have not been able to gauge in a broad way for two decades – when the last comprehensive reports on clergywomen were published.

Here are a few of the insights of the report:

  • In 1960 women were 2.3% of U.S. clergy. In 2016 women are 20.7% of U.S. clergy.
  • Since 2015 Roman Catholic lay ministers outnumber priests in the U.S., and 80% of them are women.
  • In 2017 women remain fewer than 25% of seminary faculty and deans, and just 11% of the presidents.
  • In most Mainline denominations, the percentage of clergywomen has doubled or tripled since 1994.
  • Unitarian Universalist and United Church of Christ clergywomen have reached numerical equity with clergymen.
  • More women of color and fewer white women are going to seminary to earn MDivs since 2008.
Learn more about The State of Clergywomen.

CFP: College Theology Society and NABPR Region-at-Large

The College Theology Society holds its Sixty-Fifth Annual Convention from Thursday evening, May 30 through Sunday noon, June 2, 2019, at Holy Cross College at Notre Dame in South Bend, Indiana.

  Full Call for Papers

NABPR Region at Large Call for Papers:


Can Christians Practices Deform Christians?

Can Christian practices damage Christian faith and life?  Can Christian practices extend harm and violence rather than promoting healing?  In her recent book, The Dangers of Christian Practice:  On Wayward Gifts, Characteristic Damage, and Sin (Yale University Press, 2018), historian Lauren Winner challenges the assumption that the church possesses a set of immaculate practices that will train Christians in virtue.  This session invites papers from various methodological or disciplinary perspectives that address Winner’s argument that, while being gifts from God, practices are also blighted by sin.

Engagements with Pope Francis’ Theological and Moral Vision

This session invites papers that engage Pope Frances’ theological and moral vision from a baptist/free church perspective. Particular attention will be given to papers that consider (1) Pope Francis’ call for a church of and for the poor, (2) his vision of a dialogical church, (3) his particular vision of social justice, and (4) his encyclical Laudato Si’.

After Charlottesville: Christian Theology and White Supremacy

White supremacy is an enduring problem in America and its churches and theology.  The alt-right Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, VA, in 2017, once again, horrifically exposed the persistence of this racialized evil. This session invites papers that: (1) discuss and engage the voices in black and womanist theologies as well as African American religious studies that are contributing to prophetic advocacy and movement building and to a political, moral, and spiritual revolution after Charlottesville; and (2) what does it mean historically, theologically, and morally for white Christians to witness against white supremacy in light of the rise of the alt-right?

Hidden Figures and Missing Voices in Baptist/Free Church Life

The rise of “global Christianity” has not only seen the emergence of international figures – such as the late Billy Graham – but also the opening of space for theological personalities and perspectives from outside traditional enclaves. This session invites proposals that engage such hidden, missing, forgotten, or little-known theological personalities and perspectives from among the baptist/free church traditions. Papers focused on figures from outside of Europe and North America are especially encouraged.

Proposals should be 250-500 words in length and must include name, current email address, and current institutional affiliation. Please submit proposals of Jason Hentschel () and Mark Medley () by December 31, 2018.  Scholars will be notified of the status of their proposal by January 28, 2019.